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Boreline replacing polypipe

In this project a 1.5” Boreline was to be used on wells where the contractor had a spooler for power cable and polypipe. The cold temperature causes problems with the polypipe as it becomes rigid and brittle every time the pump is removed from the well.

Boreline can operate in sub-zero conditions and is ideal in remote areas where ranchers need water for their cattle.

In this installation one can see the connecting of the pump and power cable to the Boreline.

       

Connecting the pump to the Boreline

The Boreline has a built-in rib that is used to support the power cable along the length of the hose.

During installation and retrieval, the power cable remains attached to the Boreline, resulting in a quicker and more efficient installation.

Rolling the Boreline onto the installation drum

Once the pump is connected and power cable joined, the hose can now be rolled onto the spooling device that the contractor will use to simply lower the pump into the well.

Boreline and pump ready for installation

Once the pump is connected and power cable joined, the hose can now be rolled onto the spooling device that the contractor will use to simply lower the pump into the well.

Arriving on site the truck backs up to the well and is positioned over the well.

The pump is placed lowered into the well and the Boreline now takes up the weight of the pump.

At the press of a button, the pump and Boreline will be lowered into the well in one, continuous length.

No joins, no welds, no splines, just non-stop installation.

Positioning the truck over the well and lowering the pump into the well

The pump and Boreline being installed

Adjusting the connection at the surface

An added advantage of Boreline is that lighter machinery can be used instead of heavy pump rigs.

This can help protect the land from damage especially during the wet season.

Adjusting the connection at the surface

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